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young people

Hilden Charitable Fund – Main Grants

In the UK, Hilden Charitable Fund offers grants of on average £5,000 to projects that support the following:

  • Homelessness.
  • Penal affairs.
  • Asylum seekers and refugees.
  • Community-based initiatives for disadvantaged young people aged 16 to 25.

Grants are rarely given to well-funded national charities. Fund policy is directed largely at supporting work at a community level; preference is given to charities with an income of less than £200,000 per year.

Deadline: 15 May

Read more and apply here. 

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Happy Days Children’s Charity

Happy Days supports groups who work with disadvantaged and disabled children and young people aged 3-17, funding day trips, theatre trips, family holidays and residential trips:

  • Day Trips & Visiting Theatre – groups can apply for a day trip to a wide variety of destinations, for example the seaside, a theme park or the theatre. They may also apply for a theatre performance or experience to visit their premises. Applicants should represent a group of young people aged 3-17 with additional needs.
  • Family Respite Breaks – family breaks can be to the seaside or the countryside, usually in the UK. Applicants must have a child or children with special educational needs, who have been victims of abuse or who have a life-limiting condition, and are aged 3-17.
  • Group Activity Holidays – groups can apply for a group activity holiday to a wide variety of destinations such as outdoor activity centres, holiday camps and sailing breaks. Applicants should represent a group of young people aged 3-17 with additional needs.

Examples of organisations supported in the past for day trips and group holidays include SEN schools and groups, young carers and women’s refuges.

No deadline specified

Read more and apply here.

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BlueSpark Foundation

BlueSpark provides funding for projects that aim to improve the education and development of children and young people by means of educational, cultural, sporting or other activities. Particular consideration is given to projects that they believe will help enhance the self-confidence, team working skills and future employability of children and young people.

BlueSpark provides funds for relatively small-scale projects which might not happen at all or would only happen on a smaller scale without their support. Funding provided by BlueSpark for any particular project must constitute a significant proportion of the costs of that project rather than being marginally incremental to its funding. If an organisation is able to raise part of the cost of a project itself, that will be a favourable factor in the assessment of a grant application, particularly where the application is for more than £2,000.

No deadline specified.

Read more and apply here.

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Esmee Fairbairn Foundation – Main Fund Grants (UK)

The Foundation funds across five main sectors – Arts, Children and Young People, Environment, Food and Social Change. Across all funding they aim to unlock and enable potential, back the unorthodox and unfashionable, build collective networks and catalyse system change.

Grants last 1-5 years and support organisations’ core or project costs, including staff salaries and overheads. They do not fund building or equipment costs, or individuals. They make small grants of up to £60,000 for one-off projects, or for testing out new ideas and collaborations – they do not support general running costs at this scale.

The sectors:

  • Arts
  • Art with a social impact
  • Supporting emerging talent
  • Organisations at a pivotal point
  • Children and Young People
  • Improving support for disadvantaged children and young people
  • The rights of vulnerable children and young people
  • Addressing the root causes of low educational attainment and challenging behaviour
  • Empowering young leaders
  • Young people leaving care
  • Environment
  • Connecting people with nature and environment issues
  • Nature conservation on land and at sea
  • Countering the effects of damaging activity
  • Lesser known plants, animals and organisms
  • Social Change
  • Participation – marginalised and excluded individuals and groups
  • Place – revitalising community life
  • Injustice – systemic change around injustice and inequality
  • Food
  • Innovation in alternative approaches
  • Food and wellbeing
  • Working towards a more coherent food sector

No deadline.

Read more and apply here.

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NICE recommends ‘Smartphone therapy’ for children with depression

Children and young people can be offered digital cognitive behavioural therapy (digital CBT, also known as computer CBT) as a first-line treatment for mild depression,according to new advice from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice). Digital CBT is delivered on mobile phones, tablets or computers, meaning users can access help quickly, avoiding waiting lists.

The guidance, for identifying and managing depression in children and young people aged five to 18, says online therapy and courses in mindfulness should be the first options for treatment of mild cases. Group CBT, group interpersonal psychotherapy and group mindfulness are also recommended as first-line treatments. NICE says that the choice of treatment should be based on clinical need and patient and carer preferences. The child or young person’s history, circumstances and maturity should also be considered. Read more here. 

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Child Health and Wellbeing Survey – North East and North Cumbria

North East and North Cumbria Child Health and Wellbeing Network wants to gather views of those from all sectors involved with children and young people in a short survey, as part of their change programme starting in February 2019.

The Child Health and Wellbeing Steering Group’s key objective is: to achieve meaningful and realistic plans for engagement across the North East and North Cumbria to effectively design and deliver improved outcomes for our children. This work aims to include colleagues from local authorities, education, physical and mental health, voluntary sector organisations, community and faith groups and all other organisations involved with children’s services.

The steering group is part of a small, but growing piece of work in the North East and Cumbria that plans to make a real difference to children’s services.

Read here to find out more and complete the survey.

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The Base LGBTQI+ support for 10-13 year olds

 

 

The BASE youth service at Barnardo’s in Whitley Bay is launching a new support group for young people aged 10-13 who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or who are questioning their sexuality or gender identity.

Taking place on Mondays from 4pm to 7pm at The BASE (26 Esplanade, Whitley Bay), the group will offer a safe space to meet other young people who are going through similar experiences. Food and refreshments are provided.

For more information contact Justine Carmichael on 0191 253 2127 or 07810540399.

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Online Safety Briefing by Northumbria Police: 20 November

 

 

 

 

 

Northumbria Police, in conjunction with South West Grid for Learning, have arranged a number of events around online safety throughout November.  Online Safety Live is a programme of events designed exclusively for professionals working with children and young people and they’re completely free to attend.

The events are two hours long and cover a broad range of online safety topics, a briefing session in its truest sense. At the end of the event all delegates receive access to an online resource area containing links to all the materials mentioned, signposting to sources of help and support as well as a live copy of the presentation itself.

The North Tyneside event takes place on Tuesday 20 November, 9.30am to 11.30am at the Langdale Centre in Wallsend.

Read more and book your place here

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The Catherine Cookson Trust

 

 

 

 

 

The Catherine Cookson Trust supports a wide range of activities including education and training, environment and conservation, arts and culture as well as general charitable purposes. The Trust’s principal aim is to identify and meet the local needs of the area in which Dame Catherine was brought up and resided. In particular the Trust supports work with young or disadvantaged people.

The Trustees funds registered charities and prefer projects and schemes which involve or are directed towards capital expenditure.

They do not generally consider applications for core funding or on-going financing, applications with a foreign element, individuals or applications for Sports Clubs/Associations.

There are no deadlines for applications.

Grant size: Although grants awarded range from between £250 and £10,000, the majority of grants are not above £1,000.

Application process: Catherine Cookson Trust website

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