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children and young people

Yapp Charitable Trust

 

 

 

The Trust make grants to small registered charities with a total annual expenditure of less than £40,000 to sustain their existing work within the following areas:

  • Elderly people
  • Children and young people aged 5 to 25
  • People with disabilities or mental health problems
  • Moral welfare – people trying to overcome life-limiting problems of a social, rather than medical, origin (such as addiction, relationship difficulties, abuse, offending)
  • Education and learning (with a particular interest in people who are educationally disadvantaged, whether adults or children)

Grants are for core funding and are only awarded to registered charities that have been formally established for at least three years.

The Trust prioritises:

  • Work that is unattractive to the general public or unpopular with other funders
  • Services that help to improve the lives of marginalised, disadvantaged or isolated people
  • Applicants that can demonstrate an effective use of volunteers
  • Charities that seek to be preventive and aim to change opinion and behaviour through raising awareness of issues, education and campaigning
  • Applicants that can demonstrate (where feasible) an element of self-sustainability by charging subscriptions/fees to service users

There are no deadlines specified.

Grant size: Up to £3,000 per year for up to three years

Application process: Yapp Charitable Trust website

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New report – vulnerable young people and the impact of COVID-19

A major new report – Out of Sight – has been launched by the National Youth Agency calling for a clear exit strategy for young people who are likely to be included in the early stages of release from lockdown measures. Download the report here.

At home and out of sight of formal services, the new report highlights the scale of young people’s needs which have increased and, in many instances, are caused by the pandemic. A clear exit strategy from lockdown is needed for young people, more than simply schools being open. Youth services have been overlooked and, all too often, youth workers have been furloughed or redeployed.

The top-three concerns are:

  • ‘Increased mental health problems’: Over a million young people have self-reported mental health issues. There is a spike in calls to Help Lines, with 84% reporting worse mental health following school closures or being no longer able to access mental health support
  • ‘Missing from education’: With schools only partially open and youth centres closed, as few as 5% of young people are currently engaged in school and have limited or no access to youth work. Even when schools re-open there are 700,000 young people persistently absent or NEET (not in education, employment or training)
  • ‘At risk, at home’: Over a million young people are at risk from any of the so-called ‘toxic trio’ of addiction, mental health, and domestic abuse. Despite this, child protection referrals have plummeted by 50% in some areas

The report identifies homelessness, self-harm and suicide, poverty and a range of other vulnerabilities and risky behaviours in potentially unsafe environments.

Read more here.

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Wooden Spoon Society – Capital Grants

Wooden Spoon is the British and Irish Rugby charity which supports projects that enhance and support the lives of children and young people (under the age of 25) who are disadvantaged – physically, mentally or socially. Each year the charity supports around 70 projects.

If a project is a physical, tangible asset of a permanent nature, it must have a minimum predicted life span of five years (preferably 10), be non-transferable and of a permanent nature. Special consideration may be given to funding life-enhancing/medical equipment if it can be shown that the useable life of such equipment is likely to be at least five years. While there is neither a minimum nor maximum grant level, it is unlikely projects of a physical nature under £5,000 in value will have sufficient substance and scale to qualify under the “projected life span” criteria.  If a project is educational or disability sports-focused, there must be a key rugby element to engage children and young people.

No min/max. Schools / non-profit. No deadline.

Read more and apply here.

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Acorns drop-in session for young people aged 14-25

Are you aged 14-25? Are you frightened by someone you are dating, or worried about violence at home? Maybe you have concerns about a friend? The Acorns Project runs a weekly confidental drop-in session for young people affected by domestic abuse in North Tyneside.

The sessions run every Monday from 4.30pm to 6pm. No appointment necessary.

Acorns Project: 7 Alma Place, North Shields, NE29 0LZ

Contact admin@acornsproject.org.uk or call 0191 349 8366.

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New mental health support in schools and colleges and faster access to NHS care

NHS England

In 2017, the Government published its Green Paper for Transforming children and young people’s mental health, which detailed proposals for expanding access to mental health care for children and young people, building on the national NHS transformation programme which is already underway.

Supported by partners, NHS England is leading the delivery of two of the programme’s main commitments:

  1. Establishing new Mental Health Support Teams (MHSTs);
  2. Trialling a four-week waiting time for access to specialist NHS children and young people’s mental health services.

The first Mental Health Support Teams will be set up in 25 trailblazer areas of which 12 trailblazers will also trial a four-week waiting time. These are expected to begin work by the end 2019. NHS England regional teams will support the trailblazers through this process.

Further plans for the development of children and young people’s mental health care will be detailed in the forthcoming NHS Long-Term Plan.

Read more here. 

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Volunteering opportunity: Could you make a real and positive difference to a child’s life?

Could you make a difference and befriend a child or young person living in care?

Do you have 6-8 hours a month to spare on an evening or weekend when you could spend time with a young person?

North Tyneside Council’s Participation, Advocacy and Engagement Team are currently looking for volunteers to be Independent Visitors for children in care in North Tyneside.  The scheme involves being matched with a young person who is currently in the care system, including children placed in North Tyneside and in neighbouring authorities. The scheme is designed so you meet the young person on a regular basis to do activities you both enjoy and hopefully build up a positive relationship. This can be anything from supporting the young person to join a sports team, seeing films at the cinema, cycling, bowling or dog walking.

Download an Independent Visitor Application Form for more information and to apply for this role or email advocacy@northtyneside.gov.uk for more information.

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